Sharp About Your Prayers

the challenges, absurdities, and joys of an urban faith

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To Tebow or Not to Tebow?

February 2nd, 2012 · 3 Comments · Faith and the City

I don’t have to remind (m)any of my fellow New Yorkers that Super Bowl Sunday is nearly upon us.  Even the buses are frosted with Giants’ blue!  We are all eager to see if Victor Cuz will get a chance to salsa in the endzone.

At church, our youth group is using the day as a backdrop for their outreach.  They will be using soup pots this Sunday to collect money for the Souper Bowl of Caring—a nationwide program (started by Presbyterians) that supports programs that address hunger.

It also seems the perfect Sunday to talk about the Tim Tebow phenomenon. Why has this overtly Christian quarterback become such a polarizing figure?

I have my ideas – What are yours?  Post here, and I’ll “post” my thoughts on Sunday.

 

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3 Comments so far ↓

  • Anonymous

    I have been wait-wait-WAITING for pastors to preach on Tebow. In fact, I recently bemoaned to my brother about how I wish our preachers would at least comment on this whole Tebow phenomenon at least a quarter of the amount that the mainstream media (and cable news channels) give to the Tebow Effect. That said–am glad our pastor will be mentioning this come Sunday. As for your question–it’s hard for me to be succinct; in fact, I even wrote a whole post on it. For now & in response to your question, this is my two cents: Every red blooded American has SOMETHING to say about Tebow. It’s a crazy phenomenon that warrants attention & YET the progressive mainline faith communities have–for the most part & understandably so–distanced themselves from the kneeling good looking prayer warrior that is Tim Tebow. Why such a polarizing figure you ask? He hits a nerve. His sincerity unnerves us; it is aggravatingly annoying at the most, uncomfortable at the least. There is something pure and sincere about Tebow. Not in his faith, so to speak. But in his “this is me, take it or leave it, I don’t care, but this is me NOT b/c I am religious but b/c I just like to kneel and pray and even sing praise songs while being taped on the field (& yes, I know I am tone deaf).” I have other opinions about Tebow & why he has reached SO much popularity. Most of it is a mixture of him being an “all American” good looking lad with his “all American” religion. But for now, this is my two cents. Really looking forward to the sermon on Sunday!

  • Lou

    I wonder if we get so caught up in trying to find the flaws within each person that we overlook the possibility that what people are showing us is truly their genuine self?
    The other thing I’m grateful for regarding Tim Tebow is that our eleven year old son – who watches everything sports and ESPN – without reservation walked around the neighborhood and through the house and on the playground singing “Our God is an awesome God” quietly to himself after watching an episode on sports televison when Tim Tebow was “miked” up. Since Tebow came on the NFL scene our son has asked a few more questions about faith. To me that’s a good thing.

  • Laura FissingerNo Gravatar

    I haven’t been a Roman Catholic since 1968. Still, I continue to cross myself when I pass a church, and I say the prayer. I’ve tried doing it without the physical component, but it helps to focus and ground me, to make the sign of the Cross. It could be seen as a “Christian show off” thing to do, a la Tim Tebow’s field praying pose. I do it anyway, because it feeds my sense of being with God during the day. I hope (and pray, yes) that Tim’s field kneeling comes just as naturally to him. I love the national talk he has inspired!